Swipe

Streetlight Records

Deep within the wind-swept marshes of war-torn medieval Japan, an impoverished mother and her daughter-in-law eke out a lonely, desperate existence. Direction: Kaneto Shindo Actors: Jitsuko Yoshimura, Jukichi Uno, Kei Sato. Special Features: New video interview with writer/director Kaneto Shindo; Rare super-8 black & white and color footage provided by actor Kei Sato, shot on location during the filming of Onibaba. Anamorphic 16 x 9, Widescreen, 2.35:1 format. Language: Japanese / Sub. English. Year: 1964 Runtime: 103 minutes.
Deep within the wind-swept marshes of war-torn medieval Japan, an impoverished mother and her daughter-in-law eke out a lonely, desperate existence. Direction: Kaneto Shindo Actors: Jitsuko Yoshimura, Jukichi Uno, Kei Sato. Special Features: New video interview with writer/director Kaneto Shindo; Rare super-8 black & white and color footage provided by actor Kei Sato, shot on location during the filming of Onibaba. Anamorphic 16 x 9, Widescreen, 2.35:1 format. Language: Japanese / Sub. English. Year: 1964 Runtime: 103 minutes.
037429185827

Details

Format: DVD
Label: CCIN
Catalog: 91858
Rel. Date: 03/16/2004
UPC: 037429185827

Details:

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More Info:

Deep within the wind-swept marshes of war-torn medieval Japan, an impoverished mother and her daughter-in-law eke out a lonely, desperate existence. Direction: Kaneto Shindo Actors: Jitsuko Yoshimura, Jukichi Uno, Kei Sato. Special Features: New video interview with writer/director Kaneto Shindo; Rare super-8 black & white and color footage provided by actor Kei Sato, shot on location during the filming of Onibaba. Anamorphic 16 x 9, Widescreen, 2.35:1 format. Language: Japanese / Sub. English. Year: 1964 Runtime: 103 minutes.

Reviews:

A frightening tale of murder and the supernatural in medieval Japan, Kaneto Shindo's classic gets the Criterion treatment in a new widescreen anamorphic transfer. Amongst the extras are a new video interview with Shindo, super 8 "home movie"-style footage shot on location by actor Kei Sato, a rare English translation of the original Buddhist fable that inspired the flick, a still gallery and more. If you thought The Last Samurai was good, you really need to see this.

 

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