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Streetlight Records

While the premise of Ben Stiller's Zoolander, a film about an intellectually challenged fashion model cum unwitting international assassin, sounds decidedly loopy, it's a movie with a smartly campy soundtrack to match, trading heavily on vintage '70s and '80s kitsch and covers. The Wiseguys' ubiquitous runway/car commercial/ballpark fave "Start the Commotion" kicks things into an infectious groove carried on by Frankie Goes to Hollywood's "Relax" (also covered flaccidly by Powerman 5000). But contemporary cuts (Orgy's "Faces," "Ruffneck" by the Freestylers, the Crystal Method's "Now Is the Time") take a back seat to modern covers that range from the sublime (Rufus Wainwright crooning a heartfelt take on the Hollies' "He Ain't Heavy, He's My Brother"; the Wallflowers' subdued reading of the Bee Gees' "I Started a Joke") to comparatively ridiculous (Nikka Costa and Gwen Stefani turning in pale impressions of Debbie Harry and Donna Summer on "Call Me" and "Love to Love You Baby," respectively). Herbie Hancock's "Rockit" and the ever-sly Moby's tasty sub-mix of Michael Jackson's hit "Beat It" also neatly bookend 15 years of club beats.
While the premise of Ben Stiller's Zoolander, a film about an intellectually challenged fashion model cum unwitting international assassin, sounds decidedly loopy, it's a movie with a smartly campy soundtrack to match, trading heavily on vintage '70s and '80s kitsch and covers. The Wiseguys' ubiquitous runway/car commercial/ballpark fave "Start the Commotion" kicks things into an infectious groove carried on by Frankie Goes to Hollywood's "Relax" (also covered flaccidly by Powerman 5000). But contemporary cuts (Orgy's "Faces," "Ruffneck" by the Freestylers, the Crystal Method's "Now Is the Time") take a back seat to modern covers that range from the sublime (Rufus Wainwright crooning a heartfelt take on the Hollies' "He Ain't Heavy, He's My Brother"; the Wallflowers' subdued reading of the Bee Gees' "I Started a Joke") to comparatively ridiculous (Nikka Costa and Gwen Stefani turning in pale impressions of Debbie Harry and Donna Summer on "Call Me" and "Love to Love You Baby," respectively). Herbie Hancock's "Rockit" and the ever-sly Moby's tasty sub-mix of Michael Jackson's hit "Beat It" also neatly bookend 15 years of club beats.
720616232427

Details

Format: CD
Label: Umgd/Hollywood
Catalog: 162324
Rel. Date: 09/25/2001
UPC: 720616232427

Zoolander [Soundtrack]
Artist: Zoolander [Movie]
Format: CD
New: Available In Store Used: Available In Store
Wish

Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Start the Commotion - The Wiseguys
2. Relax - Frankie Goes to Hollywood
3. Call Me - Nikka Costa
4. Love to Love You Baby - No Doubt
5. I Started a Joke - The Wallflowers
6. He Ain't Heavy...He's My Brother - Rufus Wainwright
7. Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go - Wham!
8. Rockit - Herbie Hancock
9. Beat It - Michael Jackson (Moby's Sub Mix)
10. Madskillz-Mic Chekka - BT (Remix, remix)
11. Faces - Orgy
12. Ruffneck - Freestylers/Navigator
13. Now Is the Time - Crystal Method
14. Relax - Powerman 5000 (previously unreleased)

More Info:

While the premise of Ben Stiller's Zoolander, a film about an intellectually challenged fashion model cum unwitting international assassin, sounds decidedly loopy, it's a movie with a smartly campy soundtrack to match, trading heavily on vintage '70s and '80s kitsch and covers. The Wiseguys' ubiquitous runway/car commercial/ballpark fave "Start the Commotion" kicks things into an infectious groove carried on by Frankie Goes to Hollywood's "Relax" (also covered flaccidly by Powerman 5000). But contemporary cuts (Orgy's "Faces," "Ruffneck" by the Freestylers, the Crystal Method's "Now Is the Time") take a back seat to modern covers that range from the sublime (Rufus Wainwright crooning a heartfelt take on the Hollies' "He Ain't Heavy, He's My Brother"; the Wallflowers' subdued reading of the Bee Gees' "I Started a Joke") to comparatively ridiculous (Nikka Costa and Gwen Stefani turning in pale impressions of Debbie Harry and Donna Summer on "Call Me" and "Love to Love You Baby," respectively). Herbie Hancock's "Rockit" and the ever-sly Moby's tasty sub-mix of Michael Jackson's hit "Beat It" also neatly bookend 15 years of club beats.
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