Streetlight Records

"Chapter One" is the debut album by the southwestern German doomsters Shaytan, though technically it's not their first release because the band was previously known as Demon Incarnate and have three full-lengths and one EP to their credit. However, with a recent line-up change, most notably the addition of the talented vocalist Julian who replaced their former female singer, they decided to make a fresh start with a new name. And one can certainly hear that the guys are not newbies. They deliver raw, no-bullshit traditional doom metal, dwelling mostly in mid tempos with occasional slowdowns and accelerations. With the appropriate dirt under their fingernails, they have created a solid foundation that draws from the primordial sludge of classic '70s heavy rock bands like Black Sabbath and Pentagram, the '80s and '90s doom of legendary acts like Trouble, Candlemass, The Obsessed and Solitude Aeturnus, while also displaying strong similarities to newer purveyors of the genre, particularly Nomad Son and Krux. Their riffs are heavy and the songs are replete with captivating choruses, often supplemented with oriental influences. There is not a single dull moment on this album, and at a mere 34 minutes, it doesn't overstay it's welcome. The warm production rounds it up perfectly, resulting in a most pleasant listening experience.
"Chapter One" is the debut album by the southwestern German doomsters Shaytan, though technically it's not their first release because the band was previously known as Demon Incarnate and have three full-lengths and one EP to their credit. However, with a recent line-up change, most notably the addition of the talented vocalist Julian who replaced their former female singer, they decided to make a fresh start with a new name. And one can certainly hear that the guys are not newbies. They deliver raw, no-bullshit traditional doom metal, dwelling mostly in mid tempos with occasional slowdowns and accelerations. With the appropriate dirt under their fingernails, they have created a solid foundation that draws from the primordial sludge of classic '70s heavy rock bands like Black Sabbath and Pentagram, the '80s and '90s doom of legendary acts like Trouble, Candlemass, The Obsessed and Solitude Aeturnus, while also displaying strong similarities to newer purveyors of the genre, particularly Nomad Son and Krux. Their riffs are heavy and the songs are replete with captivating choruses, often supplemented with oriental influences. There is not a single dull moment on this album, and at a mere 34 minutes, it doesn't overstay it's welcome. The warm production rounds it up perfectly, resulting in a most pleasant listening experience.
8022167091105
Chapter One
Artist: Shaytan
Format: CD
New: Not currently available
Wish

Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. SHAYTAN
2. SALTING THE EARTH
3. SPEAKING IN TONGUES
4. TABULA RASA
5. THE SLEEPLESS EYE
6. DARVAZA
7. EMBERS GLOW
8. DIASPORA
9. SAMSARA

More Info:

"Chapter One" is the debut album by the southwestern German doomsters Shaytan, though technically it's not their first release because the band was previously known as Demon Incarnate and have three full-lengths and one EP to their credit. However, with a recent line-up change, most notably the addition of the talented vocalist Julian who replaced their former female singer, they decided to make a fresh start with a new name. And one can certainly hear that the guys are not newbies. They deliver raw, no-bullshit traditional doom metal, dwelling mostly in mid tempos with occasional slowdowns and accelerations. With the appropriate dirt under their fingernails, they have created a solid foundation that draws from the primordial sludge of classic '70s heavy rock bands like Black Sabbath and Pentagram, the '80s and '90s doom of legendary acts like Trouble, Candlemass, The Obsessed and Solitude Aeturnus, while also displaying strong similarities to newer purveyors of the genre, particularly Nomad Son and Krux. Their riffs are heavy and the songs are replete with captivating choruses, often supplemented with oriental influences. There is not a single dull moment on this album, and at a mere 34 minutes, it doesn't overstay it's welcome. The warm production rounds it up perfectly, resulting in a most pleasant listening experience.
        
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